Vaccines

The kittens will be given the 4-in-1 vaccine at 7 weeks. Based on the info below, I recommend that the new owner give another 4-in-1 shot at or after 16 weeks.

The feline leukemia vaccine and the rabies vaccine will not be given, since this kitten will most likely be an indoor cat.


The following vaccination notes were written by Dr. Lisa A. Pierson, DVM

www.catinfo.org/?link=vaccines


Kittens:

Vaccinate kittens with FVRCP twice starting at 8-9 weeks of age with the second, and final kitten vaccine, administered when the kitten is no younger than 16 weeks of age.

(We wait until the kitten is at least 16 weeks old to receive his last kitten shot, because maternal antibodies within the kitten can 'tie up' the vaccine before his body has a chance to respond to it if given too young.)


Young Adults

The older a kitten is (past 16 weeks of age) when he receives his last kitten shot, the less inclined I would be to give a booster shot 1 year later.

Another option would be to test his titer (antibody level) to panleukopenia to help you make a decision. This is what I would personally opt for.


Adults

I do not repeat the FVRCP vaccine past the kitten shots - or past the 1-year booster as discussed above.


Consider the facts that enter into the risk-benefit analysis:

1) A single, properly-timed, FVRCP vaccine confers life-long immunity to panleukopenia (the most serious disease among the 3 that the FVRCP targets) in the vast majority of cats.

2) Herpes and calici vaccines lack the ability to induce complete protection.

3) Herpes and calici viral infections do not have a high mortality rate.

4) Even though a non-adjuvanted FVRCP vaccine is much less likely to cause a sarcoma, sarcomas (cancerous tumors) have been noted with these vaccines.

5) The FVRCP vaccine has been shown to cause kidney inflammation. Given how common chronic kidney disease is in cats, this fact influences my vaccine decisions.


Supporting research regarding vaccinations:

1.  A Science-Based Vaccination Schedule

Dr. Ron Hines recommends vaccines at 12 weeks, 16 weeks, and 20 weeks. Then a core booster at 1 year. Then nothing else for at least 7 years.

2ndchance.info/ScienceBasedVaccinationSchedule.htm


2. Guidelines for Feline Vaccinations

animalhealthfoundation.net/blog/2017/12/dr-jean-dodds-feline-vaccination-protocol


3. 2015 Vaccination Guidelines

wsava.org/Guidelines/Vaccination-Guidelines


4. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis possibly associated with over-vaccination

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1748-...